Ms. Furnari: Classroom to Courtside

Algebra+Teacher+Sherry+Furnari+analyzing+game+statistics+before+and+during+the+basketball+game.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Ms. Furnari: Classroom to Courtside

Algebra Teacher Sherry Furnari analyzing game statistics before and during the basketball game.

Algebra Teacher Sherry Furnari analyzing game statistics before and during the basketball game.

Ms. Furnari

Algebra Teacher Sherry Furnari analyzing game statistics before and during the basketball game.

Ms. Furnari

Ms. Furnari

Algebra Teacher Sherry Furnari analyzing game statistics before and during the basketball game.

Amanda Pallas, highlights contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Known as a math teacher here at Gables, Ms. Furnari is known as a Miami Heat statistic person when she steps onto the court at the American Airlines Arena.  Here,  Furnari shares her dedication to math both inside and outside of school.

Q: For how long have you been working at Gables?

A: This is my 31 year at Coral Gables and my 31 year teaching.

Q: What do you teach?

A: I teach…Algebra 2 Regular, Algebra 1, Intensive Math and Algebra 2 Honors Gifted.

Q: Why did you choose to teach Math at Gables?

A: Actually Coral Gables found me; when I graduated from college in New York, my parents moved down here and I applied downtown…Coral Gables was the first [school] that called me.  I was 21 years old.

Q: When did you start off as a stat person for the Miami Heat?

A: I started 26 years ago.

Q: Why did you choose to become a stat person for the Heat?

A:  I knew somebody at the University of Miami.  I worked their stats first and the people who work at University of Miami worked the Heat games…I missed a year and half of the Heat and then they brought me over.

Q: Are there any requirements in order to be a stat person? What are they?

A:  Well [I] had to prove that [I] knew the game of basketball and [I was prepared because] I coached here for 2 years. In order to be a stat person [I] had to take a test….every year you need to know every single thing about the game.

Q: What do you enjoy most about being a stat person?

A:  Besides just being involved with the Miami Heat, [I think] the organization is top notch. They treat you very well, they respect you, and it is a great place to work.  The people that I work with are very good friends of mine and we get along very well.

Q: What do you have to do as a stat person?

A:  [On a typical day] , I leave here [at] about 5:15 [and] get to the arena at quarter to six. I go out to the court and I put in the injury lineups, check the rosters, [and] make sure every number matches the player, because you have active and inactive players, and that has to be done by a certain time.  Then I go eat, and then I go back out at around seven, double check the roster, [and] make sure everything is ok and that is it; the game goes on.

Q: How often do you calculate stats?

A: Every home game. Every home team has their own stat crew, so when I have a game, I am doing stats for the away team and my team. I am doing everything that is happening on the court, so I don’t travel.  I only do the home games.

Q: Is it hard being a stat person?

A: It could be if you are not involved in sports.  It is not hard. I think being a math person [helps] because of all the numbers and things that you work with [require]…you be logical [and] rational, [and because] it calms you down when things are going on and it gets very stressful. The game goes on, [and if]  you miss something there are other people there that check, because…they have to check what I am doing and make sure everything goes in.  You have to do footage on the court; whether [there are] alley-oops, dunks, rebounds, [or] officials, you got to have everything in there.

Q: What is your least favorite part about being a stat person?

A:  [My] least favorite [part] is getting home at 12, 12:30, at night and getting up at 4:15.