BLUE Missions Experiences Continue To Impact Our Cavaliers

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BLUE Missions Experiences Continue To Impact Our Cavaliers

BLUE Missions Volunteers pose for a group picture after a hard day's work.

BLUE Missions Volunteers pose for a group picture after a hard day's work.

Leslie Ramos

BLUE Missions Volunteers pose for a group picture after a hard day's work.

Leslie Ramos

Leslie Ramos

BLUE Missions Volunteers pose for a group picture after a hard day's work.

Stephanie Andrade, Staff Writer

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BLUE Missions is an organization built on the idea that everyone should have access to basic necessities like clean water and sanitation, primarily focusing its efforts on countries in Latin America. BLUE missions has connected over 19,000 people to clean water and 4,300 people with basic sanitation. Some of our very own Cavaliers have participated and demonstrated that anyone can truly make a difference.

In the beginning, it is a culture shock to say the least. As a volunteer, you have to sleep in a cot without air conditioning or a proper bathroom, and the ultimate goal is to have all of the proceeds go to the community in which the organization is visiting and help multiple families in the process. Volunteers participate in mixing cement, cutting wood and hammering in nails. Everyone spends ample time with local families and they learn about the countries’ cultures through first-hand experience.

Leslie Ramos

Leslie Ramos                                                               Several Cavaliers and their BLUE Missions peers participate in trench-digging.

Grade 10: Maureen Mazloum and Sabrina Bonavita

Sophomore Maureen Mazloum or “Momo” spent eight days in the Dominican Republic on a water trip.  A water trip, as Mazloum explained, consists of building an aqueduct system that allows families to have access to water in their homes, serving as a mechanism for individuals to avoid having to walk several miles to have clean water.

The volunteers dig trenches, lay pipes, mix cement and build a water tank. The gravity-driven aqueduct starts in the mountains and uses water from a nearby river.

“Honestly, it was a life-changing experience that I will never forget. We are so fortunate, but we do not realize it at all. This trip was extremely eye-opening, and I will forever be changed in the way I view things. I 100% recommend going on a BLUE Missions trip,” sophomore Maureen Mazloum said.

Maia Berthier
Sophomore Sabrina Bonavita plays games with the Dominican children while on her BLUE Missions trip, forging friendships and bonds that will last a lifetime.

Another sophomore, Sabrina Bonavita, spent eight days in the Dominican Republic with her sister, Juliana. Bonavita is very passionate and grateful for the time she spent on this trip.

“I became friends with the greatest people and everyone in the village is so welcoming and grateful for everything they have.  Although we live more luxurious lives, they have something we do not. They have a sense of community, which can trump owning a sink, shower, or toilet.  Their faces when the clean water arrived brought me so much joy which I had never felt before. More importantly, we lived in the moment. We forgot about our troubles and embraced our surroundings and culture. My time in the Dominican Republic was unforgettable and it has forever changed my perspective on my life and on the world,” sophomore Sabrina Bonavita said. 

Grade: 11 Alexandra Torres

Maia Berthier                                                    Alexandra Torres embraces and carries her new friend in the Dominican Republic.

Junior Alexandra Torres has done two BLUE Missions trips and she looks forward to participating more in upcoming years.

“It is an amazing experience to see them finally being able to enjoy their day and not having to spend it worrying about getting water. All they have to do is turn on a faucet. It is a very hands-on organization because you get to work one on one with the families, you get to bond with the Dominicans and you realize how privileged we are. They do not have toys, not even clean water and their houses are falling apart. Even with all of that, they are the happiest people I have ever met. They have their families and it shows you that is all you need.” junior Alexandra Torres said.


 Several countries’ communities are in the same position as the Dominican Republic’s, and contributions from organizations like BLUE Missions are making the world a better place. Volunteers got a sense of leadership and learned how important it is to give back to other communities, and their trip this summer offered them a truly enriching and life-changing experience.

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  • A smiling Dominican woman on water day.

    Alexandra Torres

  • Our Cavaliers and others celebrating all their hard work.

    Leslie Ramos

  • Sabrina Bonavita, Maïa Berthier and Mccall Henree throw their muddy hands in the air.

    Leslie Ramos

  • The children of the Dominican Republic celebrating the long-awaited arrival of water day.

    Leslie Ramos

  • BLUE Missions volunteers celebrate their accomplishments and embrace their Dominican friends.

    Leslie Ramos

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